Part I The Composition Process

ENGLISH I & II

The Composition Process at the college level is about expanding your writing abilities. The first course in a series of first-year writing courses focuses on introducing students to the concepts and practices of rhetoric and composition. The course prepares students to compose texts in a variety of genres for various purposes, audiences, and contexts, including digital environments. The course emphasizes analytical and critical skills: rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, argument, and reflection. Students use writing processes to draft, peer review, revise, edit, and reflect on their work. The course assignments and projects prepare students for varied writing contexts at the university and in their future professional career. This text contains readings and assignments that prepare students for success.

Chapter 1: The Composing Process

“Writing in College” by Joseph M. Williams and Lawrence McEnerney

“What Is ‘Academic’ Writing?” by L. Lennie Irvin

“What is an Essay?” provided by Candela Open Courses

“Critical Thinking in College Writing: From the Personal to the Academic” by Gita DasBender

“Ten Ways To Think About Writing: Metaphoric Musings for College Writing Students” by E. Shelley Reid

“Effective Communication and Persuasion” by Carol Burnell, Jaime Wood, Monique Babin, Susan Pesznecker, and Nicole Rosevear

“Writing Anxiety” provided by UNC College of Arts & Sciences

Chapter 2: Critical Concepts

“Rhetorical Context” provided by Lumen Learning

Chapter 3: Defining the Composing Process

“Rhetoric and Composition/Analyzing Assignments” provided by Wikibooks

“Idea Mapping” provided by University of Minnesota

“Journalistic Questions” provided by Writing Commons

“Clustering: Spider Maps” provided by Writing Commons

Chapter 4: Rhetorical Invention & Planning

“Why Study Rhetoric? or, What Freestyle Rap Teaches Us about Writing” provided by Writing Commons

“Reading Academic Texts” provided by Lumen Learning

“Active Reading” provided by Writing Commons

“What are New Literacies?” provided by Writing Commons

“Tone, Language, and Appeal” provided by Lumen Learning

“What to Think about When Writing for a Particular Audience” provided by Lumen Learning

“Consider Your Purpose” provided by Lumen Learning

“Consider Your Context” provided by Writing Commons

“Consider Your Media” provided by Writing Commons

“Document Planner” provided by Writing Commons

Chapter 5: Composing Strategies

“Think Rhetorically” provided by Lumen Learning

“Navigating Genres” by Kerry Dirk

“Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement” provided by University of Minnesota

“Effective Means for Writing a Paragraph” provided by Candela Open Courses

“Writing Effective Paragraphs” provided by the University of Richmond Writing Center

“Transitional Words and Phrases” provided by the University of Richmond Writing Center

“What Logical Plan Informs Your Paper’s Organization?” provided by the Writing Center

“Using Modern Language Association (MLA) Style” provided by University of Minnesota Libraries

“How to Write an Engaging Introduction” provided by Writing Commons

“How to Write a Compelling Conclusion” provided by Writing Commons

Chapter 6: Revising & Recomposing

“Higher Order Concerns” provided by Lumen Learning

“Reflective Writing and the Revision Process: What Were You Thinking?” by Sandra L. Giles

“Style” provided by Writing Commons

“In-class Peer Review” by Joe Moxley and provided by Writing Commons

“Reflect on What You’ve Learned” provided by Writing Commons

“Navigate Reader Suggestions Wisely” provided by Writing Commons

“Reflect on Your Writing by Joe Moxley” and provided by Writing Commons

Chapter 7: Publishing / Circulation: Media Matters

“Writing Spaces Web Writing Style Guide” provided by Writing Spaces

Chapter 8 ePortfolio

“Electronic Portfolio” provided by Wikipedia

“Building a Blackboard Portfolio” website provided by Elizabeth Burrows

Chapter 9: Narrative

“Literacy Narrative” by the authors

“Reflective Writing Prompts: Narrative Assignment” by the authors

Chapter 10: Analysis and Evaluation

“Analysis/Evaluation” provided by the authors

“Reflective Writing Prompt: Analysis and Evaluation Assignment” by the authors

Chapter 11: Argument

“Argument” provided by the authors

“Handout: How to Make an Effective Argument” provided by Lumen Learning

“Reflective Writing Prompt: Argument Assignment” by the authors

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Composing Ourselves and Our World by Elizabeth Burrows, Angela Fowler, Heath Fowler, and Amy Locklear is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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